CTS News

The Free Press (Mankato), October 23, 2018

Traffic fatalities have been cut nearly in half since the Toward Zero Deaths initiative was founded 15 years ago. But state law enforcement and transportation officials leaders said Tuesday they are going to need to be more creative to make Minnesota's roads even safer. “We've had a great 15 years,” said Stephanie Malinoff, an executive with the University of Minnesota Center for Transportation Studies. “We're seeing that (road deaths) trend line moving in the right direction.

StarTribune, October 23, 2018

Unlike ride-sharing firms Uber and Lyft, where customers are driven to their destinations, car-sharing involves patrons driving themselves to wherever they need to go. Hourcar’s model — for now — involves customers picking up a vehicle at one of its 50 hubs in Minneapolis and St. Paul and returning it to the same place.... Frank Douma, director of the State and Local Policy Program at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs and CTS Scholar, said car-sharing “only works in certain places. We don’t have the density of Boston or [Washington, D.C.] or San Francisco.”

StreetsBlogUSA, October 18, 2018

A ground-breaking experiment in St. Paul, Minnesota, shows a shocking pattern of dangerous and aggressive behavior towards pedestrians. But also how solvable the problem is given the right attention and policies. For most of 2018, researcher Nichole Morris, director of the HumanFIRST Laboratory at the University of Minnesota, has been measuring driver yielding at crosswalks around St. Paul.

KSTP-5 TV News, October 11, 2018

The University of Minnesota and the City of St. Paul are teaming up to try to change drivers' behaviors. The St. Paul Police Department has been working on the study at eight treated intersections since May.... Nichole Morris with the University of Minnesota said initially some of the intersections had as few as 18 percent of drivers stopping for walkers. Now the average is 75 percent.

KROC–106.9 Radio (Rochester), October 10, 2018

The Destination Medical Center initiative in Rochester has been chosen to participate in a University of Minnesota research project concerning the use of autonomous vehicles. The National Science Foundation grant will provide the U of M with $1.75 million over three years to work toward the possible development of what’s termed a “smart cloud commuting system.” Proponents envision community’s using large pools of shared autonomous vehicles to provide inexpensive transportation services to everyone. Initiative on the Sharing Economy director Saif Benjaafar is quoted.

Pioneer Press, October 08, 2018

University of Minnesota researchers received a $1.75 million grant to continue studying the future impact of self-driving vehicles. The 3-year grant from the National Science Foundation will research connecting communities with self-driving cars through shared data and will recommend guidelines for future transportation projects. Researchers will partner with the Minnesota Department of Transportation, Metropolitan Council and Metro Transit which are also studying the potential effects of self-driving vehicles in Minnesota.

StarTribune, October 06, 2018

Urban design experts at the University of Minnesota are redrawing what city blocks could look like in a world of driverless vehicles. Roads of the future will likely be narrower, greener and easier to share with pedestrians once autonomous vehicles evolve from the drawing boards and testing roads of automakers and tech firms to widespread use on city streets. The move to wrest the controls from human drivers is gaining traction. The U has just received a $1.75 million grant from the National Science Foundation to further study autonomous vehicles and the future of transportation services.

ECN Magazine, October 05, 2018

The University of Minnesota announced today that it has received a $1.75 million grant over three years from the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the NSF's Smart & Connected Communities grant program. The University of Minnesota’s project is one of only 13 projects chosen by NSF nationwide.

University of Minnesota News, October 05, 2018

The University of Minnesota announced today that it has received a $1.75 million grant over three years from the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the NSF's Smart & Connected Communities grant program. The University of Minnesota’s project is one of only 13 projects chosen by NSF nationwide.

University of Minnesota CSE News, October 05, 2018

The University of Minnesota announced today that it has received a $1.75 million grant over three years from the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the NSF's Smart & Connected Communities grant program. The University of Minnesota’s project is one of only 13 projects chosen by NSF nationwide.

National Science Foundation News, October 04, 2018

The National Science Foundation (NSF) announced approximately $22.6 million in Smart and Connected Communities (S&CC) awards, supporting 13 projects involving researchers at 35 institutions nationwide, including the University of Minnesota. NSF's S&CC program supports researchers working with communities and residents to identify and define challenges they face and designing research projects to help address them.

StarTribune, September 30, 2018

Minnesota state law requires motorists to give 3 or more feet of clearance when passing a bicyclist, and the good news is a large majority of drivers obey. In collaboration with Hennepin County, University of Minnesota graduate students looked at how much room drivers allow when passing bicyclists and how often they pass within fewer than 3 feet. Researchers found that the type of bicycle lane dictated how much space motorists gave.

University of Minnesota, September 28, 2018

Why are there food deserts in the heart of some of the most productive farm country in the world? That’s a good question. Through the one-of-a-kind rural Minnesota Backhaul Project, the U of M’s Kathy Draeger is connecting rural grocers and farmers to bring new sources of fresh food to Greater Minnesota.

Minnesota Daily, September 26, 2018

Using new technology that can measure the distance between bicycles and passing vehicles, University of Minnesota graduate students studied the vehicle passing distance on various types of bicycle infrastructure within Hennepin County. A Minnesota statute requires a minimum vehicle passing distance of 3 feet. Anything less than that is defined as “encroachment,” and can increase the likelihood of a cyclist being injured.

StarTribune, September 21, 2018

The concept is called “backhauling” and it’s been spearheaded by an alliance of the University of Minnesota, a garlic farm and grocery store in Big Stone County, and two grocery wholesalers as part of an experiment aimed at giving local farmers a way to get their produce onto grocery store shelves. “After that last stop, that truck is empty and it’s basically hauling air coming home,” said Duke Harrison, head of transportation and warehousing for Mason Brothers, a grocery distributor in Wadena.

Rochester PostBulletin, September 19, 2018

Road design and infrastructure are the biggest factors in cycling safety on roads shared by cars and bikes, a University of Minnesota study found. The study was published in ITE Journal, a monthly publication by the Institute of Transportation Engineers. Research by UM graduate students Josh Pansch, Isaac Evans and Lila Singer-Berk looked at factors that affect distances cars come within bikes when passing.

StreetsBlog USA, September 18, 2018

A new study by the University of Minnesota finds that drivers are less likely to pass cyclists at a dangerously close distance if there’s a bike lane — particularly if the bike lane is physical separated from traffic. “[It’s] evidence that investments in these types of bike facilities may reduce potentially risky interactions between vehicles and cyclists,” said Greg Lindsey, the University of Minnesota professor who co-authored the study.

Hartford Courant, September 18, 2018

Metro Hartford ranked in the Top 10 list of most-improved job access by transit in the country, compiled by the University of Minnesota's Accessibility Observatory.

Minnesota Daily, September 17, 2018

The Gopher RideShare program, which was launched this fall by the Parking and Transportation Services, aims to reduce car congestion, improve air quality, decrease wear and tear on the road and allow individuals to save money by exploring various transportation options.... Transportation methods such as biking and walking aren't always an option for commuters, resulting in more cars flocking to campus and congestion.

University of Minnesota News, September 13, 2018

Transportation infrastructure that encourages bicycling without interfering with traffic flow or exceeding budgets is a key issue for many state and local governments. Ensuring the safety of bicyclists is a central part of this challenge. University of Minnesota graduate students Josh Pansch, Isaac Evans and Lila Singer-Berk studied the factors that affect vehicle passing distance (VPD) on different bicycle facilities across Hennepin County.